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Xylitol as a sugar substitute

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19 Jan 2014 15:18 #19630 by shae
shae created the topic: Xylitol as a sugar substitute
Thoughts on using Xylitol as a sugar substitute? I have a mouth full of cavities and am looking to improve my dental health. I’ve read that xylitol can help prevent and maybe even reverse cavities. I’m currently using mints and gum that contain xylitol in the hopes of preventing future cavities.

I’ve also read that it does not cause your sugar level to spike like other sweeteners. While unfiltered local honey is my first choice, I’m thinking about adding xylitol to my list of sweeteners.

"Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it." - Confucius

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19 Jan 2014 16:13 - 19 Jan 2014 16:59 #19636 by david
david replied the topic: Xylitol as a sugar substitute
My take on this after reading Sugar Blues is that anything that is processed as in not found straight off mother Nature's shelf may or can or will have a detrimental effect on the body. What comes from the land is what I call WHOLE meaning it contains all the necessary information for the body to process it correctly. When something is manufactured in a lab then it may and probably does leave out something important. Lets take reverse osmosis water as an example. When all the minerals are removed from the water it becomes 'hungry' water which is more acidic and leaches minerals from whatever it comes into contact with. I call these lab made substances Frankenstein products.

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19 Jan 2014 17:02 #19638 by TheFastDoctor
TheFastDoctor replied the topic: Xylitol as a sugar substitute
Why, dear Shae, do you want a sugar "substitute"? We don't need sugar at any time. Some studies indicate it kills more people than smoking. If you never eat sugar, your taste buds become more sweetness sensitive, which allows you to perceive the wonderful delicate sweetness of many foods which otherwise go unnoticed.

I can not fathom any way in which a carbohydrate/sugar can reverse dental caries. The best way of preventing cavities is to keep the teeth clean and never eat anything containing added sugar.

I agree David, everything we eat should contain whole cells. Preferably plant cells. Once the cell is broken up and we consume isolated constituents, it is by definition out of balance. I hope upon my return from India beginning of February to make a video about this principle, specifically for this site.

Your formulation is really good, I am tempted to plagiarize that!

André

All my posts are "generic", based on my opinions and experiences only and are not intended to replace the advice of your own licensed medical practitioner.
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19 Jan 2014 18:45 #19646 by shae
shae replied the topic: Xylitol as a sugar substitute
Dr. it’s true I don’t need sugar but I crave it. So instead of buying prepackaged candy and treats I intend to make healthier versions at home. I’m not at a point where I am willing to give up all junkie sweets. My original intention was to use honey, as it has done wonders for my sinuses, allergies, and hair. Then reading about Xylitol promising dental benefits, I thought I’d get some opinions on it.
David your point is well taken. I believe we get caught up in terminology. Just because it’s a naturally substance doesn’t mean it’s healthy. Great insight!!

"Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it." - Confucius

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20 Jan 2014 11:11 #19652 by TheFastDoctor
TheFastDoctor replied the topic: Xylitol as a sugar substitute
Problem is that this creates a false biofeedback and it interferes with your natural biofeedback at the same time. Anyway, if I ever want something sweeter than starch, I prefer honey. Honey is also a universal antimicrobial: You will never see hone "go off" or grow a mold.. thus I think in terms of dental care it would actually be better than the synthetic Xylitol.

André

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20 Jan 2014 14:28 #19656 by Lisafast
Lisafast replied the topic: Xylitol as a sugar substitute
I use either stevia (another "natural" substance) or liquid sucralose in my coffee or tea. I bought some dark chocolate bars sweetened with stevia this week which I allow myself a small amount on my eating days. Ideally, you would get your sweet taste from fruit or from natural foods but my taste buds are so used to sweetness and I am glad that I stopped eating sugar itself, and I was so addicted to raw honey that I went through jars and jars of it. So I believe that to work your way towards the ideal is better than what most people eat. I have always chewed sugarless gum occasionally, usually when I can't get to my toothbrush (which I keep in my purse ha ha) and that is usually sweetened with sorbitol or xylitol I think. I work as a hairdresser and am in very close proximity to my clients and I never want to have bad breath. I do notice on those rare occasions where I eat something made with flour or wheat, that it leaves a coating on my mouth. Eating whole foods, like blueberries, for example doesn't have the same effect, as a matter of fact, eating blueberries makes my teeth feel like I just brushed them.

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20 Jan 2014 14:34 #19657 by TheFastDoctor
TheFastDoctor replied the topic: Xylitol as a sugar substitute
One problem of having taste in your mouth all day, dear Lisa, is that your taste buds "burn out". That means that you practically stop tasting your food properly as the poor taste buds are simply too tired to respond. Then you need to eat more and stronger tastes in order to get the necessary feedback to terminate the hunger feelings. One of the nicest experiences of a fast is just how much more sensitive your taste become, which also makes it a more reliable source of biofeedback.

André

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25 Jan 2014 22:47 - 25 Jan 2014 22:49 #19735 by Lux
Lux replied the topic: Xylitol as a sugar substitute
Stevia is probably OK, but sucralose is far from splendid. It is much more closely related chemically to DDT. The class of chemicals it belongs to are all very toxic poisons. How sucralose escaped identification as one too is amazing. The steps taken to get it past the FDA are a textbook case of the evils of collusion between industry and government. Sucralose was approved by the FDA as a tabletop- and general-purpose sweetener in processed foods in 1998. The FDA claims the approval was based on more than 110 animal and human safety studies. However, what they don't specify was that out of these 110 studies, only two were human studies, consisting of a combined total of 36 people, of which only 23 people actually ingested sucralose.

Additionally, the longest of these two human trials lasted only four days and looked at sucralose in relation to tooth decay, not human tolerance! People who use any artificial sweetener have much higher incidence of obesity. A better approach to health is to eat natural foods. A study published in 2008 found that sucralose:
  • Reduces the amount of good bacteria in your intestines by 50 percent
  • Increases the pH level in your intestines, and
  • Affects a glycoprotein in your body that can have crucial health effects, particularly if you're on certain medications like chemotherapy, or treatments for AIDS and certain heart conditions
They also found unmistakable evidence that sucralose is absorbed by fat, contrary to previous claims.

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02 Feb 2014 09:17 #19862 by TheFastDoctor
TheFastDoctor replied the topic: Xylitol as a sugar substitute
Most important perspective, dear Lisa, is that you don't need "sugar" or "Sweeteners". Not the substances nor the taste. Once you remove it from your diet your taste buds become a lot more sensitive, enabling you to appreciate that most carbohydrates and many amino acids actually taste sweet.

Thanks Lux. Your comment is as always much appreciated

André

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12 Feb 2014 00:35 - 12 Feb 2014 00:38 #20188 by loquat1
loquat1 replied the topic: Xylitol as a sugar substitute
@Lisa

I use either stevia (another "natural" substance) or liquid sucralose in my coffee or tea.


I'm with Lux on this one. Sucralose is just a commercial name for Aspartame, which is just about one of the biggest food industry cons ever perpetrated on an unsuspecting public. Hence the change of name - a cynical ploy specifically designed to confuse the public and disguise its real identity.

Lisa, if you value your health, please stop consuming this toxic junk. If you want the proof, I can send you the links via a PM if you want. I repeat, this stuff is lethal - please don't touch it with a barge pole.
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12 Feb 2014 00:45 #20189 by david
david replied the topic: Xylitol as a sugar substitute
and that makes Greeks even more bona fide members of the human race. Thank you.

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