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Fatty foods before and after fast

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17 Nov 2011 00:36 #9395 by Joy
Joy replied the topic: Re: Fatty foods before and after fast
Dear Dr., The following quote is from the DRY FAST section on this website. What do you think of its recommendation of fatty yugurt and so on for breaking a dry fast? In your expertise opinion, does breaking a dry fast have different guidelines than breaking a water fast? Thanks for your time.

◦The first two days after the Dry Fast must include drinking of pure water, eating mainly fresh protein-rich foods of animal origin: fatty yogurt, cottage cheese, sour cream, cheese, fish and chicken broth, boiled fish, chicken, eggs, etc. On the second day in the morning you can eat a slice of bread (no yeast is better), and in the evening - a hot cereal (oatmeal) or boiled vegetables.
◦Within the first 2 days you cannot eat raw vegetables and fruits, and raw foods of plant origin.
◦If you have eaten something wrong, and you feel nauseous, or you experience a metallic taste in the mouth, or have a rotten egg tasting burps, or swelling appeared, you must urgently drink a glass or two or three of kefir and switch back to animal protein.
◦Rule 2 is mandatory for everyone, including vegetarians. This does not contradict a vegetarian diet. This is necessary because after the Dry Fast body is in a dire need of “building materials”, i.e animal protein, for the synthesis of proteins and new cells.
◦Violation of Rule 2 can lead to negative consequences!

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17 Nov 2011 01:45 - 17 Nov 2011 01:45 #9396 by Esmée La Fleur
Esmée La Fleur replied the topic: Re: Fatty foods before and after fast
Dear Joy,

I am not a doctor, but I have completed a 3.5, 5, 8, and 10 day dry fast. I am a vegan and did not follow the guidelines you have quoted above. I simply resumed eating my normal foods and experienced no difficulties.

The only mistake I did make was to drink pure undiluted coconut water to break my fast. I do not recommend this, as it gave me a terrible migraine headache. I have come to the conclusion that the electrolytes in the coconut water are much too concentrated for immediate post-fast rehydration. Now, I dilute the coconut water (1 part coconut water to 3 parts plain water), and this seems to work just fine.

Blessings, Esmée

Please see my article What is Dry Fasting for further information

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17 Nov 2011 04:37 - 17 Nov 2011 04:45 #9399 by Joy
Joy replied the topic: Re: Fatty foods before and after fast
Hi, Esmee. I read your article and I found it informative. I especially like the following passage:

"In a dry fast, the body does not eliminate toxins in the same manner as it does during a water fast. Instead of removing toxins through the normal channels of elimination, skin, liver, kidneys, urine, and bowels, it actually turns each cell into a tiny incinerator and burns the toxins up inside of the cell. One thing I have noticed since I started dry fasting is that I have almost no body odor or bad breath during a dry fast, while I always experienced this during a water fast. Each day of a dry fast is said to be equivalent to 3 days of a water fast in terms of detoxification, so you accomplish much more in a shorter time."
I do wonder what happens after toxins are burned inside the cell-incinerators. The "ashes" after the burning have to come out of our body in some way, don't they?

However, my quesiton is not whether one could break dry fast with juice/fruit etc.. I have no problem with that.

Dr. Andre says again and again that upon breaking a water fast one should consume enough juice/fruit (carbo) before taking in protein/fatty foods; otherwise it could be injurious to the body. But this Russian doctor recommends protein/fat foods to break a dry fast and cautions agains carbo. So I would like to know what Dr. Andre, with his medical knowledge, thinks of this recommendation--whether the body functions differently during a dry fast and a water fast.

I do appreciate your sharing your personal experience. God bless you.

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17 Nov 2011 06:30 - 17 Nov 2011 06:39 #9400 by Esmée La Fleur
Esmée La Fleur replied the topic: Re: Fatty foods before and after fast
Hi Joy,

I look forward to Dr. André's response also. :o)

If you have not read his e-book Health Won, I highly recommend it.

However, please keep in mind that while Dr. André does have experience doing short dry fasts (3 days being his longest I believe), he has said many times on this forum that he does not recommend dry fasting to his patients. Therefore, he does not have the same level of experience with dry fasting as Dr. Filonov does.

As you have pointed out, for water fasting, Dr. André does recommend breaking the fast with carbohydrate-rich foods in order to replace the glucose in the cells. I cannot personally understand why it would be any different for a dry fast, and I chose to break my dry fasts the same way I have broken all of my water fasts and I did not seem to suffer any negative consequences as a result.

But Dr. Filonov has been supervising dry fasts for a very long time, so I am sure he has his reasons (based on his experience with his patients). Also, Dr. Filonov is Russian and his post-fast food recommendations may be partly cultural. Kefir is served to all children first thing in the morning when they arrive at school.

In his book, Dry Medical Fasting, Dr. Filonov says something about the protein foods being necessary to get the pancreas functioning quickly again after the dry fast, but he doesn't really explain it (or the translation does not do his explanation justice).

Unfortunately, we do not have the benefit of a debate between Dr. Filonov and Dr. André, lol...

Hopefully, Dr. André will jump in here soon and gives us his medical opinion on your excellent question.

Blessings, Esmée

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17 Nov 2011 07:09 - 17 Nov 2011 07:12 #9401 by Joy
Joy replied the topic: Re: Fatty foods before and after fast
Esmee, Thank you for responding. Breaking any fast with light juice/fruit seems to be more reasonable. But I would like to see what Dr. Andre will say regarding the Russian Doctor's recommendation of protein/fatty foods (and no carbo!) after a dry fast.

Since you have done plenty of dry fast, will you tell me what dry fast did to your skin? I suppose dry fast results in rapid weight loss.

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17 Nov 2011 07:30 #9402 by TheFastDoctor
TheFastDoctor replied the topic: Re: Fatty foods before and after fast
Thank you for the implicit trust in my opinion, which is based not only on theoretical medical knowledge and experience but also on the measured changes in the blood.. changes one cannot see when examining a patient.

We all have huge reserve capacty in our organs. Your heart can pump enough blood for 5 resting people at the peak of your youth; your lungs can breathe for 6, etcetera. We often ruin our health through "consuming" this reserve when we're young and don't feel the difference yet. But then it catches up with you when you are older.

Protein is carbohydrates plus Nitrogen, which turns it into (amino)ACIDS. The only advantage it has to pure carbohydrate as a source of energy is that it releases carbohydrates slowly. But to do so, the nitrogen is released as ammonia, which is poisonous. It puts a huge burden on the liver and kidneys. Vegetarians have a much slower loss of kidney function over time than meat eaters. Thus, although a high protein diet can appear beneficial on the short term, it reduces your life expectancy and quality of life in your later years.

I'd like to reiterate: NEVER consume protein rich food while you are stil catabolic (in a fasting metabolism) as this will gear your enzymes towards protein breakdown (releasing ammonia). Thus your body considers protein to be a source of energy, endangering your muscles and organs. You need to revert to anabolism on pure carbohydrates before adding a bit of protein (just enough to satisfy your STRUCTURAL (not energy) requirements. This way your metabolism will always protect your protein (muscle, organ, tencon, etc.) and in doing so reduce the rate of degeneration and aging.

André

All my posts are "generic", based on my opinions and experiences only and are not intended to replace the advice of your own licensed medical practitioner.

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18 Nov 2011 02:59 #9403 by Joy
Joy replied the topic: Re: Fatty foods before and after fast
Dr., thank you. Your science-based reply is exactly what I need to reassure me that ending a fast with juice/carbo is the right way. Your reply is very easy to understand. (I do have your book health-won but I could not manage to read through the first section of it. It seems too technical for me to comprehend. I am a literature person. I think I will try again.)

May I ask two other questions?
(1) Is it alright to end a fast with fresh green juice (made from fresh greens like spinach, kale, collar green, and cucumbers and carrots)? Is there too much protein in greens for breaking a fast?
(2) Is it alright to end a fast with sub-acid fruit like pineapples and grapefruits? (I do know you prefer papayas. Unfortunately the papayas in this season are not good. They are mostly green unripe type.)

I am Day 3 on my fast. I plan to fast for 6 days and I would like to break my fast the healthy way. I have done numerous short water fasts in the past few years. So far I feel fine, with no detox sumptoms except for a little weakness. I am almost doing a dry fast. I just have a sip of water several times a day to test if I am in need of water (as you recommended). I only did one 2-day dry fast about two years ago and felt fine. I will switch to water fast whenever I feel like drinking water.

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18 Nov 2011 09:05 #9404 by TheFastDoctor
TheFastDoctor replied the topic: Re: Fatty foods before and after fast
Thank you for your thank you.

1. I believe green juices are an ideal way to break your fast, particularly if your biofeedback leads you in that direction.

2. The classification of fruit into groups including "sub-acid" does not seem to have any foot in science. I could not find any measurables to base such classification upon. The reason to prefer papaya is primarily the enzymes it contains.. making digestion easier.

Once again: If your biofeedback agrees and you feel good on it, go for it.

Once more bear in mind that toxins are liberated from the tissues during a fast.. it would be a good idea to eliminate these. Do consider some active elimination therapies such as the 5-step cycle.. it makes things easier and safer.

André

All my posts are "generic", based on my opinions and experiences only and are not intended to replace the advice of your own licensed medical practitioner.

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18 Nov 2011 15:13 #9405 by Joy
Joy replied the topic: Re: Fatty foods before and after fast
Dr. , thank you for giving your blessings on green juice and pineapple (which supposedly is also rich in enzymes) as good food to break a fast.
Actually I don’t like green juice that much. Sweet fruit pleases me more. But I read that the first bite/drink after a fast tastes most delicious. So I hope that by using green juice to break my fast I may have a new appreciation for green juice, the most healthy drink. I plan to break my fast with green juice this time and see what happens.

Yes I very much appreciate your elimination therapy. I go to the steamroom in my gym pretty much every day during a fast. I know from experience that if I do not manage to sweat once a day I may very well end up with a headache during fasting. I do exercise whenever my energy level allows me to do it.

I remember an after-fast experience that was a little scary and I wonder if you may shed some light on what was happening. A long while ago, I water-fasted for 5 days. On the sixth day, I broke the fast with a large melon meal. 2 hours later I walked to a nearby train station to catch a train to another city. When I got to the train station, I started to feel extreme physical weakness that I could hardly stand. I managed to get on the train. As I reclined on my train seat during the 2-hour train ride, I felt alright, with no discomfort. But when I got off the train, I again felt extreme weakness that I could not remain standing. I was compelled to sit down by the roadside for 20 minutes. After that I felt better and got up and was able to go about doing my business. There was no more weakness or discomfort after that.
Have you seen similar cases? I still cannot figure out what was the reason for my extreme weakness after I broke the 5-day water fast.

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18 Nov 2011 20:51 #9406 by Esmée La Fleur
Esmée La Fleur replied the topic: Re: Fatty foods before and after fast
Hi Joy,

That is a very interesting experience. I know your question ins for the doctor, but I want to share some information with you that I recently discovered and which prompted me to make some changes in my own diet.

You may want to read the book The Sugar Fix by Dr. Richard Johnson. It is all about the perils of eating too much fructose. Fruits contain about 50% fructose and 50% glucose on average, but some fruits such as water melon are around 75% fructose. I have a terrible reaction to watermelon whenever I eat it, and I know others who have reported feeling dizzy, spacey, and weak.

Fructose is metabolized very differently in the body than glucose and it creates uric acid as a by-product. Uric acid is associated with all sorts of health problems; namely all of the Syndrome X metabolic disorders (obesity, high blood pressure, high LDL, low HDL, high triglycerides, insulin resistance).

Fructose requires the enzyme fructokinase to be broken down and utilized by the cell. Some people produce more fructokinase than other people. We generally think of enzymes as being a good thing, but in this case it is not. The more of these enzymes a person produces the more uric acid they produce after ingesting fructose and the more health problems that can result. This is true of any fructose, not just that from white sugar or high-fructose corn syrup (both of which are also 50% fructose and 50% glucose).

I ate a high fruit diet for 2 years and experienced a lot of problems. I am definitely a person who produces a high number of fructokinase enzymes. I know about 6 others who have had a similar experience as me. I am now eating sweet potato and winter squash for my carbohydrates, instead of fruit, and I feel sooooooo much better.

Blessings, Esmée

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19 Nov 2011 01:07 #9407 by TheFastDoctor
TheFastDoctor replied the topic: Re: Fatty foods before and after fast
Thank you dear Esmée for your insight.

I have to point out, however, that it is totally and utterly impossible for Fructose to form Uric Acid, as the latter molecule contains 4 Nitrogen atoms, whereas fructose contains none. Since your body contains no nuclear reactor to produce elements, you cannot form uric acid from fructose.

My personal diet contains a lot of fructose and I don't avoid it at all.. we have enzymes that transform the 6 basic monosaccarides from one to the other. The end product of all their metabolisms are water and carbon dioxide.

Syndrome X comes primarily from pure overweight and lack of physical activity. Regular fasting is in my experience the best way to avoid and treat it.

And dear Joy, a steam room is an excellent 3rd step in the elimination cycle but please be sure to precede it with exercise and massage, and follow it with cooling down and rest. In isolation it does very little more than heat you up.

Happy fasting all!

André

All my posts are "generic", based on my opinions and experiences only and are not intended to replace the advice of your own licensed medical practitioner.

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19 Nov 2011 03:40 - 19 Nov 2011 03:49 #9408 by Esmée La Fleur
Esmée La Fleur replied the topic: Re: Fatty foods before and after fast
Dear Dr. André,

I highly respect your medical knowledge, but I think there may be something here for you to explore.

Have you read Dr. Johnson's book The Sugar Fix? If not, then I would like to hear what you think after you read his book.

Dr. Johnson is a medical doctor, with a specialty in nephrology, who has spent most of his career studying this issue. He has personally conducted many laboratory and clinical studies on both animals and humans.

His book is full of references to peer-reviewed published studies by other researchers as well. His book was published in 2008 and it is the first time this information has been made available to a general audience (outside of the scientific community).

I have been struggling with a fruit-based diet for the past two years and, after reading his book, I finally understand why. He is very adamant that fructose metabolism creates uric acid. The mechanism is different than the uric acid created by the breakdown of purines. It is not a consequence of the breakdown of the fructose, but its metabolism, which is a different thing altogether (if I understand him correctly).

I do not believe that there have been any studies on how fructose from fruit only affects people, and this kind of study sorely needs to be done. He does state that vitamin C and potassium both help to eliminate uric acid from the body, so it is reasonable to assume that the uric acid created during the metabolism of fructose from fruit will be more easily eliminated from the body, but it will not prevent its production in the first place. (However, one study did find that people who consumed one apple per day--which is very high in fructose--has a 60% increased risk for developing gout.)

The only thing that influences the production of uric acid from fructose is how many fructokinase enzymes one produces. Some people produce 3 times more than other people, and some lucky folks produce none at all. Several families with this genetic anomaly are currently being studied and, so far, they appear to be immune to all of the illnesses associated with high uric acid levels. They do not develope obesity, high blood pressure, high LDL, low HDL, high triglicerides, or insulin resistance.

My mother recently did a high fruit diet for 6 months and her HDL dropped to 14 with a total cholesterol of 189, giving her a chol/HDL ratio of 13! Her triglycerides are also elevated at 173. My mother has a tendancy toward the Syndrome X illnesses and has been obese all her life. She tested borderline diabetic about 10 years ago, as did her father and brother (who is now on medication).

I have been in communication with about 8 other people who have been following a low-fat fruit-based diet for the past several years who are all displaying symptoms of excess uric acid production.

I do believe that a high-fruit diet can work marvelously well for some people, and I would be willing to bet that those who appear to thrive on fruit are low fructokinase producers. Anne Osborne, who has been a complete fruitarian (no greens) for over 20 years and successfully raise 2 boys on only fruit, recently told me that her uric acid level is in the low/normal range.

Before reading Dr. Johnson's book, I had read Dr. Christopher Vasey's book The Acid-Alkaline Diet. In there he says that some people cannot properly metabolize the "weak acids" in fruit and that this will cause all sorts of health problems. One of the symptoms he gives (and there are many) is acne from fruit. From the very first day that I began a fruit-based diet I developed very severe acne on my back, shoulders, neck, and face.

I now believe that Dr. Vasey was right, but for the wrong reasons. I do not believe it is the "weak acids" in fruits that are the problem, but the production of uric acid from the metabolism of the fructose in the fruit. When I eat fruit, the pH of my urine will go from 7.3 down to 5.6, no matter how many greens I eat to help alkalinize my system. I have asked many others to test their urine after eating a fruit-based meal, and the majority of people remain quite alkaline (between 7.0-8.5). This suggests that either 1) I produce a LOT of fructokinase and, thus, a LOT of uric acid; or 2) I am not able to eliminate the uric acid I do produce very effectively.

The metabolism of fructose is much more rapid than the metabolism of glucose and it can deplete the ATP in the cell by as much as 50%. After eating fruit, I can experience severe energy crashes (and others in my cohort group have reported the same experience). It is much more severe with the consumption of fruits that have more fructose than glucose, such as the watermelon, apples, pears, or grapes.

Fruits that are balanced like figs (which our chimp ancestors practically live off of) do not have any negative effect on me at all. I also notice that fruit with more calcium than phosphorus, such as figs, do not affect me as negatively either. I believe this is because they have a stronger alkalinizing effect and help to neutralize the uric acid that is produced.

All of our modern fruits have been hybridized to be sweeter than their wild counterparts. I suspect that they contain a higher percentage of fructose (which is sweeter in taste than glucose) than their wild counterparts as well. Producing a lot of fructokinase enzymes may have been an advantage during a time when only small amounts of fructose were available to us on the savannahs of Africa because this would allow us to extract more calories from the foods containing fructose that we stumbled upon. However, it is not so much of an advantage in a time when fructose is plentiful both as fruit and refined sugar.

Dr. Johnson recommends no more than 30 gm of fructose per day, which is equivalent to 5 oranges. Many people on a fruit-based diet are eating close to 200 gms a day consistently. For those who are low fructokinase producers, this may be totally harmless. But, for those who are high fructokinase producers, this may be a complete disaster.

Based on my own biofeedback, I am convinced that fructose, even from whole natural fruit, is very bad for me personally. Finding Dr. Johnson's book was like hearing God say, "Let there be light..."

Blessings, Esmée

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19 Nov 2011 09:10 #9409 by TheFastDoctor
TheFastDoctor replied the topic: Re: Fatty foods before and after fast
Thank you so much for the lecture dear Esmée, I do appreciate the effort.

I personally prefer to get my information from sicentific peer reviewed sources such as

www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/glyc...r_authors/index.html

and I must be honest with you, I would never waste my time reading the ramblings of someone who claims that fructose can make uric acid. It is just not physically possible.

Whilst observations are by definition valid, their interpretation should be carefully considered before we conclude a causal relationship. Blaming a molecule consisting of Carbon, Hydrogen and Oxygen for producing another molecule that contains a lot of Nitrogen.. well, that's just far fetched to say the least. Unfortunately this will see the rest of the same author's ideas being tainted so that I cannot justify spending time on these either.

It is our duty, when we observe a beneficial phenomenon, to at least try getting to the bottom of its mechanisms. It seems as if my esteemed colleague has jumped to conclusions which is not accepted by the rest of the profession, including academics with no vested interest in industry.

Wishing you the best of health in eating and fasting.

André

All my posts are "generic", based on my opinions and experiences only and are not intended to replace the advice of your own licensed medical practitioner.

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19 Nov 2011 09:51 - 19 Nov 2011 10:37 #9410 by Esmée La Fleur
Esmée La Fleur replied the topic: Re: Fatty foods before and after fast
Dr. Johnson's book can hardly be described as "someone's ramblings." Most people I know would not make it past page 5 due to its technical nature. It is nothing but page after page of scientific studies.

But here are two of his own (I tried to find the links for you, but was unsuccessful):

"Fructose-induced hyperuricemia as a causal mechanism for the epidemic of metabolic syndrome." Nature Clinical Practice Nephrology 1(2006):80-86.

"A causal role for uric acid in fructose-induced metabolic syndrome." American Journal of Physiology-Renal Physiology 290 (3) (2006): F625-31

I am sorry that I cannot list all of the studies in Dr. Johnson's book for you (there are more than 35) which support his argument, but I would have to transcribe his book to do so, and I do not have time for that.

His conclusions are based on his own research and that of many others. He makes a pretty powerful case of it in my humble opinion. However, it would be interesting to hear what other medical practitioners think who have read his work. I am sorry that you do not have the time or interest to explore the subject.

I was not giving you a lecture, dear doctor. I was sharing information with you that you appear not to be aware of. If you feel you have nothing new to learn about this subject, so be it.

I did not major in chemistry, but in anthropology, history, and literature, so I am clearly not in the same league as you where science is concerned. It may well be that Dr. Johnson is completely wrong in his conclusions, and that I am a naive simplton who is easily mislead buy specious scientific arguments that I cannot understand. But I am not sure why a doctor who clearly cares about his patients/readers and wants to help them to be healthier, as Dr. Johnson does, would try to mislead his patients/readers to do something that would be bad for them, especially when he has nothing to gain from the advice he is giving.

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19 Nov 2011 09:57 - 19 Nov 2011 10:36 #9411 by Esmée La Fleur
Esmée La Fleur replied the topic: Re: Fatty foods before and after fast
Here are some studies by Dr. Johnson et al that I did find links to:

Excessive fructose intake induces the features of metabolic syndrome in healthy adult men: role of uric acid in the hypertensive response

Fructose-induced metabolic syndrome is associated with glomerular hypertension and renal microvascular damage in rats

A causal role for uric acid in fructose-induced metabolic syndrome

Potential role of sugar (fructose) in the epidemic of hypertension, obesity and the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, kidney disease, and cardiovascular disease

Hypothesis: Could Excessive Fructose Intake and Uric Acid Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

The Effect of Fructose on Renal Biology and Disease

These are just a few that I found. There are many, many more.


I am quite aware that Dr. Johnson gets funding from PepsiCO, but I am not sure how it is to his advantage to malign all fructose, which is what he does in the book. Frankly, I was surprised that he could say what he did and still continue to receive funding for his research. The only place that fructose appears to be an advantage is for endurance athletes who need rehydration beverages. Dr. Johnson specifically states in his book that no one should be drinking Gatorade or similar beverages if you are not an athlete.

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19 Nov 2011 11:16 - 19 Nov 2011 11:18 #9412 by TheFastDoctor
TheFastDoctor replied the topic: Re: Fatty foods before and after fast
Seems we'll have to agree to disagree on this one dear Esmée.

Do forgive my suspicions when a single person or a small group disagrees with an entire scientific community and has vested interests in a junk food industry. Do bear in mind that some scientists are members of the flat earth society also!

It unfortunately happens SO often that people learn about one (or a couple) of the 300-odd nutrients we need, then attempt to maximize the implications of this one nutrient. Some concentrate on "vitamins" or a single vitamin, at a time some people "cured" everything by giving dissociated amino acids instead of natural proteins, etc.. in many cases there are good results but we have real difficulty in the scientific world to distinguish the placebo effect from real physiological interactions.

I prefer to stick with what Nature teaches us. We have taste buds to guide us. And we are all different. Plus, we go through different biorhythms. There are almost no absolutes. I for one am perfectly happy to have a fructose rich diet, even one dominated by fructose as a source of energy, and I do have an impressive health record to back me up..

Best wishes and thanks for a very intellectually stimulating exchange!

André

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19 Nov 2011 12:27 - 19 Nov 2011 12:30 #9413 by Joy
Joy replied the topic: Re: Fatty foods before and after fast
Your intelectual exchange is very interesting indeed.

So, Dr. Andre, what do you think of my somewhat scary experience after my 5-day water fast? What might be the reason for my physical weakness 2 hours after a large melon meal?

By the way, at a later time, I did a 6-day water fast and broke the fast with a large honeydew melon meal and felt totally fine.

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19 Nov 2011 21:14 #9414 by Esmée La Fleur
Esmée La Fleur replied the topic: Re: Fatty foods before and after fast
Dear Joy,

You might find it interesting to know that

1 lb of honeydew provides 14 gms free fructose, 13 gms of free glucose, and 12 grams of sucrose (of which 6 gms is fructose) for a total of 20 gms of fructose and 19 gms of glucose, or a 1:1 ratio.

1 lb of watermelon provides 16 gms of free fructose, 8 gms of free glucose, and 6 gms of sucrose (of which 3 gms is fructose) for a total of 19 gms of fructose and 11 gms of glucose, or a ratio of almost 2:1.

I have noticed, and so have others I have been discussing this issue with on the low-fat raw-vegan forums, that fruits with more fructose than glucose are the most problematic. I experience extreme physical and mental problems after consuming watermelon and and other fruits with more fructose than glucose.

Dr. Johnson explains that fructose is metabolized very rapidly and depletes the cell of ATP. This information is published in peer-reviewed, scientific papers.

The reason not everyone has a problem with high-fructose fruits is because we all produce different levels of fructokinase enzymes. The more enzymes you produce, the more trouble you will have with fructose.

Blessings, Esmée

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19 Nov 2011 21:25 - 19 Nov 2011 21:26 #9415 by Esmée La Fleur
Esmée La Fleur replied the topic: Re: Fatty foods before and after fast
Dear Dr. André,

I really don't understand why you think the information Dr. Johnson is offering about the potential perils of fructose for some people is a benefit to him financially. I see no way that he can gain from sharing such information with the public. He is not telling people to forgo fruit in favor of high-fructose corn syrup laden beverages made by PepsiCo.

Rather, it is quite the contrary. Dr. Johnson would much prefer people get all their fructose from whole foods. So, your reason for not giving credence to anything he says about the health problems related to high fructose consumption for some people like myself is quite odd to me.

All I know is that the biofeedback of my own body, and the biofeedback of a number of others I know, strongly supports the research in Dr. Johnson's book.

Just because you do well with fructose yourself, does not negate the possibility that others do not.

Blessings, Esmée

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20 Nov 2011 09:11 - 20 Nov 2011 09:14 #9416 by TheFastDoctor
TheFastDoctor replied the topic: Re: Fatty foods before and after fast
Dear Joy, you were obviously detoxifying acutely during your previous fast, resulting in high concentrations of toxins in the blood, causing your symptoms. After all, we fast primarily in order to mobilize toxins. During your subsequent fast(s) the level of "available" toxins were much lower, giving you less or no symptoms.

This is the basis upon which I recommend people doing active detoxification activities during fasting. It greatly reduce these symptoms.

And dear Esmée, as always you're right. Not everone responds well to Fructose. But so does not everyone respond well to apples also: I developed an intolerance to these. This is why I have an adversity to "blank" and "tunnel vision" advice like that of my good colleague dr Johnson, focusing on one or a very small number of factors in a much, much larger picture.

This whole issue is further complicated by a phenomenon called the "self fulfilling prophecy" which we encounter every day. If you convince people that something's good or bad, the body's anticipation of the subsequent reaction may cause the reaction. We see this most pronouncedly demonstrated in people under hypnosis and in the double blind placebo controlled studies that all medicines now have to be scrutinized by..

incidentally, Fructose generates, NOT depletes, ATP.

André

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